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courses:brain-computer_interfaces [2012/03/03 23:43]
Simon-Shlomo Poil [What can you expect from this tutorial?]
courses:brain-computer_interfaces [2014/04/07 23:59] (current)
Simon-Shlomo Poil [What can you expect from this tutorial?]
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-====== Brain computer interface: Introduction ======+====== Brain computer interface (BCI): Introduction ======
  
 Owing to the developments in the neurosciences and computer technology, it has become possible to link brain activity to the operation of computers and devices, creating a direct communication channel between mind and machine (for reviews, see Van Gerven et al., 2009 and Wolpaw et al. 2002). This is possible with a //brain-computer interface// (BCI), which exploits the fact that certain aspects of brain activity are linked to specific mental states and processes, called 'signatures' (Van Gerven, 2009). A BCI is a combination of techniques for recording brain activity, extracting and processing signatures, and translating aspects of the signature into computer commands, which are fed back to the user (Fig. 1). There are BCIs that partially restore movement and/or communicative capabilities in paralysed patients (Birbaumer & Cohen 2007), as well as BCIs that explore new ways of playing computer games (Nijholt et al. 2009).   Owing to the developments in the neurosciences and computer technology, it has become possible to link brain activity to the operation of computers and devices, creating a direct communication channel between mind and machine (for reviews, see Van Gerven et al., 2009 and Wolpaw et al. 2002). This is possible with a //brain-computer interface// (BCI), which exploits the fact that certain aspects of brain activity are linked to specific mental states and processes, called 'signatures' (Van Gerven, 2009). A BCI is a combination of techniques for recording brain activity, extracting and processing signatures, and translating aspects of the signature into computer commands, which are fed back to the user (Fig. 1). There are BCIs that partially restore movement and/or communicative capabilities in paralysed patients (Birbaumer & Cohen 2007), as well as BCIs that explore new ways of playing computer games (Nijholt et al. 2009).  
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     * For an overview and explanation of all parameters in the Config window in BCI2000, see the [[http://www.bci2000.org/wiki/index.php/User_Reference:Parameters | parameters user reference]] on bci2000.org.     * For an overview and explanation of all parameters in the Config window in BCI2000, see the [[http://www.bci2000.org/wiki/index.php/User_Reference:Parameters | parameters user reference]] on bci2000.org.
     * Also check the Wikipedia page on Brain-Computer interfaces [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain-computer_interface]]     * Also check the Wikipedia page on Brain-Computer interfaces [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain-computer_interface]]
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 ===== References ===== ===== References =====
courses/brain-computer_interfaces.1330818211.txt.gz · Last modified: 2012/03/03 23:43 by Simon-Shlomo Poil
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